In The News


Original Source: http://chedet.cc/?p=1361#more-1361

Title: Boeing Technology – What Goes Up Must Come Down

Date Posted: 18 May 2014

Full Transcript of Blog Post

1. What goes up must come down. Airplanes can go up and stay up for long periods of time. But even they must come down eventually. They can land safely or they may crash. But airplanes don’t just disappear. Certainly not these days with all the powerful communication systems, radio and satellite tracking and filmless cameras which operate almost indefinitely and possess huge storage capacities.

2. I wrote about the disabling of MH370’s communication system as well as the signals for GPS. The system must have been disabled or else the ground station could have called the plane. The GPS too must have been disabled or else the flight of MH370 would have been tracked by satellites which normally provide data on all commercial flights, inclusive of data on location, kind of aircraft, flight number, departure airport and destination. But the data seems unavailable. The plane just disappeared seemingly from all screens.

3. MH370 is a Boeing 777 aircraft. It was built and equipped by Boeing. All the communications and GPS equipment must have been installed by Boeing. If they failed or have been disabled Boeing must know how it can be done. Surely Boeing would ensure that they cannot be easily disabled as they are vital to the safety and operation of the plane.

4. A search on the Internet reveals that Boeing in 2006 received a US patent for a system that, once activated, removes all control from pilots to automatically return a commercial airliner to a pre-determined landing location.

5. The Flightglobal.com article by John Croft, datelined Washington DC (1st December, 2006) further mentioned “The ‘uninterruptible’ autopilot would be activated – either by pilot, by on board sensors, or even remotely by radio or satellite links by government agencies like the Central Intelligence Agency, if terrorists attempt to gain control of the flight deck”.

 6. Clearly Boeing and certain agencies have the capacity to take over “uninterruptible control” of commercial airliners of which MH370 B777 is one.

7. Can it not be that the pilot of MH370 lost control of their aircraft after someone directly or remotely activated the equipment for seizure of control of the aircraft.

8. It is a waste of time and money to look for debris or oil slick or to listen for “pings” from the black box. This is most likely not an ordinary crash after fuel was exhausted. The plane is somewhere, maybe without MAS markings.

9. Boeing should explain about this so-called anti-terrorism auto-land system. I cannot imagine the pilots made a soft-landing in rough seas and then quietly drown with the aircraft.

10. Someone is hiding something. It is not fair that MAS and Malaysia should take the blame.

11. For some reason the media will not print anything that involves Boeing or the CIA. I hope my readers will read this.

A newsreader from CtiTV News in Taipei finds out as she is reading a breaking news item, in real-time, that her friend and colleague has died. She admirably maintains her professionalism but this is gut-wrenching to watch.

(Watch on Youtube and turn on captions for subtitles).

© Danesh Daryanani (www.streetsingapore.com)

No country in Asia makes the cut, thankfully. There isn’t a top 100 list – would loved to see where Singapore, India, China, Korea and Japan sits.

  1. Belarus – 17.5 litres
  2. Republic of Moldova – 16.8 litres
  3. Lithuania – 15.4 litres
  4. Russian Federation – 15.1 litres
  5. Romania – 14.4 litres
  6. Ukraine – 13.9 litres
  7. Andorra – 13.8 litres
  8. Hungary – 13.3 litres
  9. Czech Republic and Slovakia – 13 litres
  10. Portugal – 12.9 litres

Get the entire report from the World Health Organisation (WHO) here. Singapore data here.

French luxury group, LVMH has bought parts of the following Singapore companies:

1. Crystal Jade Group – Over 90% stake

2. Ku De Ta – 51% in the nightclub’s holding company

3. Charles & Keith – 20% stake

4. Heng Long Tannery (supplies exotic crocodile skins to high fashion houses) – 51% stake

5. Sincere Watch & Jewellery – 26.3% stake

I wonder what else, if anything, they are going to buy.

Source article: Herworldplus

Channel News Asia (CNA) carried an article this morning headlined, “Singapore best place in Asia to be a mother.”

We were actually number 15 globally in this table based on a study by “Save the Children.” The article assumes that Australia, which was at number 9, is not part of Asia.

rankingI read CNA’s headline and thought, “Oh boy. This is going to a lot of Singapore mothers’ knickers in a twist.”  While there are comments on CNA’s thread on their Facebook page both applauding and denigrating the article, here are some of the detractor’s comments (unedited):

“But is it the best place to be a children? They are so stressed over academic achievements here. A lot of ppl I know wish to migrate with their kids for a more stress free life.”

Agree with this article, but they should also post an article Singapore rank in bottom half as a place to be a mom based on other categories. Don’t only write the positive, also look at the negative, that’s how the nation can improve.”

“Best place? Mum stresses for Child’s education, not included?”

It goes on – you can go to their Facebook post to see all the comments – good and bad.

Personally, I thought it was odd that we were ranked the “best place in Asia to be a mother.” When I read CNA’s article, I came to the realisation that the context was not painted adequately. The “Mothers’ Index” by Save the Children is derived from health, educational and economic factors. Their work seems aimed at developing countries where women’s mortality, safety, and economic progress are major issues. These are not issues faced by developed nations like Singapore.

Here is a quote from the CNA article:

“In Singapore, lifetime risk of maternal mortality has been cut by 80 per cent, child mortality decreased by 25 per cent, gross national income per capita doubled and percentage of women in parliament increased six-fold over the past 15 years, the report noted.

Singapore has done well on the index, far ahead of its regional counterparts, with significant cuts in maternal and child mortality, as well as improvements in the percentage of women in leadership positions in the country,” said Greg Duly, Regional Director for Save the Children in Southeast and East Asia.”

So the foremost issues that concern the organisation seem to be mortality, economic and leadership progress of women.

My hunch is that the issues that make being a mother in Singapore challenging are our education system, time with child, stress, and money (lower and sandwiched class). These do not seem to be measured in the study.

The headline, “Singapore best place in Asia to be a mother,” in my view, is a sweeping generalisation. Yes, it is true based on the study but a wider context to frame this statement would have been more accurate.  For example, “Singapore best place in Asia to be a mother” with a sub-head that clarifies that it is based on mortality, economic progress, etc. The article could then elaborate on issues Singapore mothers face.

This sweeping headline will no doubt create much debate and conversation online. Oh wait, that could have been the intention.

In which case, ignore all of this.

Link to State of the World’s Mothers Report (Full Report)

 

 

 

My favourite talk show host, hands down. I’ve been watching him since the 1980s.

He’s sharp, scathing, self-deprecating (sometimes) and quick.

The guy is from Indiana so  additional affinity developed during my time in Indiana University (1986 to 1988).

I’ve definitely been influenced by his sense of humour.

He’s done more than 14,00 shows. I think sartorially he’s very eloquent too – sharp.

Thank goodness for Youtube that he continues to live. Thanks David.

DD from Singapore.

The MH370 incident is being watched by the whole world. Being under the spotlight, I assume that Malaysia Airlines writes each statement very intentionally with every sentence being carefully calibrated.

On Monday, 24 March 2014, Malaysia Airlines sent this SMS to the family members of those missing on MH370:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

(Source: Financial Times)

Now, here is the exact same statement with emphasis placed by me:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

If I had a daughter on that plane (I do not), how would I react to this?

Let me re-write the statement with the emphasis that me, as a fictional father, would react to:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and your daughter is dead. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

No matter how “beyond reasonable doubt” it is, the statement admits to being an assumption.

This is not going to give the fictional me (as a father) any closure.

If the findings were conclusive, what would have given me closure (though not comfort) is a statement of this nature:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have conclusive evidence that MH370 has crashed and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we have evidence that the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

But that’s not what they wrote.

 

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