A newsreader from CtiTV News in Taipei finds out as she is reading a breaking news item, in real-time, that her friend and colleague has died. She admirably maintains her professionalism but this is gut-wrenching to watch.

(Watch on Youtube and turn on captions for subtitles).

Channel News Asia (CNA) carried an article this morning headlined, “Singapore best place in Asia to be a mother.”

We were actually number 15 globally in this table based on a study by “Save the Children.” The article assumes that Australia, which was at number 9, is not part of Asia.

rankingI read CNA’s headline and thought, “Oh boy. This is going to a lot of Singapore mothers’ knickers in a twist.”  While there are comments on CNA’s thread on their Facebook page both applauding and denigrating the article, here are some of the detractor’s comments (unedited):

“But is it the best place to be a children? They are so stressed over academic achievements here. A lot of ppl I know wish to migrate with their kids for a more stress free life.”

Agree with this article, but they should also post an article Singapore rank in bottom half as a place to be a mom based on other categories. Don’t only write the positive, also look at the negative, that’s how the nation can improve.”

“Best place? Mum stresses for Child’s education, not included?”

It goes on – you can go to their Facebook post to see all the comments – good and bad.

Personally, I thought it was odd that we were ranked the “best place in Asia to be a mother.” When I read CNA’s article, I came to the realisation that the context was not painted adequately. The “Mothers’ Index” by Save the Children is derived from health, educational and economic factors. Their work seems aimed at developing countries where women’s mortality, safety, and economic progress are major issues. These are not issues faced by developed nations like Singapore.

Here is a quote from the CNA article:

“In Singapore, lifetime risk of maternal mortality has been cut by 80 per cent, child mortality decreased by 25 per cent, gross national income per capita doubled and percentage of women in parliament increased six-fold over the past 15 years, the report noted.

Singapore has done well on the index, far ahead of its regional counterparts, with significant cuts in maternal and child mortality, as well as improvements in the percentage of women in leadership positions in the country,” said Greg Duly, Regional Director for Save the Children in Southeast and East Asia.”

So the foremost issues that concern the organisation seem to be mortality, economic and leadership progress of women.

My hunch is that the issues that make being a mother in Singapore challenging are our education system, time with child, stress, and money (lower and sandwiched class). These do not seem to be measured in the study.

The headline, “Singapore best place in Asia to be a mother,” in my view, is a sweeping generalisation. Yes, it is true based on the study but a wider context to frame this statement would have been more accurate.  For example, “Singapore best place in Asia to be a mother” with a sub-head that clarifies that it is based on mortality, economic progress, etc. The article could then elaborate on issues Singapore mothers face.

This sweeping headline will no doubt create much debate and conversation online. Oh wait, that could have been the intention.

In which case, ignore all of this.

Link to State of the World’s Mothers Report (Full Report)

 

 

My posts concerning the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 is as interesting as spending an evening studying the facial expressions of the Merlion.

“Come on, Danesh, there is so much interesting ‘news’ surrounding the missing aircraft.”

It’s been almost a week since MH370 has gone missing. The lack of information and conflicting reports makes excellent fodder for comedy. It makes even better fodder for conspiracy theories. Best of all, the ground is  fertile for speculation.

But this boring old man simply shared updates from Malaysia Airlines (which I’ve stopped).

While legit news is ok, Comedy, Conspiracy Theories and Speculation are last things family members of those gone missing in MH370 need to hear and read about. They need the truth. As painful as not knowing is, comedy, conspiracy and speculation adds confusion and despair to their already unbearable anxiety.

So I shut up and pray.

Yep, it’s true. For a whopping US$16 billion made up of US$12 billion in stock and US$4 billion in cash. If you include the additional  US$3 billion in restricted stock units to WhatsApp’s founders and employees as part of the deal, the total acquisition price goes up to US$19 billion.

In the unlikely event that the deal does not go through, Facebook will pay a breakup fee of $1 billion to WhatsApp, which is  more than the  amount Facebook paid to acquire Instagram.

“WhatsApp is on a path to connect 1 billion people. The services that reach that milestone are all incredibly valuable,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement. WhatsApp has over 450 million monthly users, 70% of whom are active on a given day. They are adding more than 1 million new registered users per day.

Facebook stock declined by more than 4.5% in after hours trading following the announcement.

Still, the Facebook Empire grows. They seem to be in the digital expansion mode like the Roman empire in their hey-days (offline mode).

Read all about it on:

Forbes, BBC and  CNBC.

 

       

 

 

 

He emerged from Apollo 11 on July 20, 1969 and became the first man on the moon, followed right after by Buzz Aldrin. As Neil took his first step on the moon’s surface, he famously declared: “one small step for [a] manone giant leap for mankind.”

Now you’ve taken your biggest leap, sir. Rest in Peace.

Links to articles:

Reuters

Los Angeles Times

USA Today

BBC

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 501 other followers