The MH370 incident is being watched by the whole world. Being under the spotlight, I assume that Malaysia Airlines writes each statement very intentionally with every sentence being carefully calibrated.

On Monday, 24 March 2014, Malaysia Airlines sent this SMS to the family members of those missing on MH370:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

(Source: Financial Times)

Now, here is the exact same statement with emphasis placed by me:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

If I had a daughter on that plane (I do not), how would I react to this?

Let me re-write the statement with the emphasis that me, as a fictional father, would react to:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and your daughter is dead. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

No matter how “beyond reasonable doubt” it is, the statement admits to being an assumption.

This is not going to give the fictional me (as a father) any closure.

If the findings were conclusive, what would have given me closure (though not comfort) is a statement of this nature:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have conclusive evidence that MH370 has crashed and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we have evidence that the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

But that’s not what they wrote.

 

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Yang Peiyi and Lin Miaoke

Yang Peiyi and Lin Miaoke

Source: NYT

I read something that disturbed me very much.

It was reported that the little girl who starred at the Olympic opening ceremony was miming and only put on stage because the real singer was not good looking enough, which was according to the show’s musical director.

The chief music director, Mr. Chen Qigang had this to say, “We were thinking about what was best for the nation. The child on camera should be flawless in image, internal feelings and expression.”

What values are we teaching? Even if the child looked as hideous as lets say, me, it is absolutely despicable what they decided to do.

Apparently the singer, Yang Peiyi did not pass a “cuteness test”.

I do not agree at all with the message this sends. Especially being the Olympics, the audience is global and many. This tells the children that ability and talent are not enough if you don’t have the looks. This is absolutely ludicrous. We are teaching the children that looks are more important than substance. Or even the teaching the children that looks are as important as substance is utterly wrong.

This obviously is no fault of the young girl who lip synched but the fault is clearly on the shallow minded, value twisted organizers of the opening ceremony.

As far as I can see, they remain unapologetic about this decision.

As far as I am concerned, I think we should let rest only for the sole reason not to traumatize two young, innocent girls but I make this point (among many others) so that the adults who decided this can learn a lesson themselves.