Today Film Article

Published by TODAY, Singapore’s second most-read newspaper, on 28th July 2016. Here is the online version.

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Pre Styling

 

During Styling

Post Styling

The Hair Stylist

In order to save time, I’ve been cutting my own hair. It works for a period but over time, it becomes a right mess as bad hair days turn to bad hair weeks and months.

I nipped out yesterday to get a haircut at my regular S$7 barbershop at Ayer Rajah but it was closed.

A few doors away, a hairdressing saloon was open. There were no customers in there and a stylist was available.

I decided to try her out.

I had SUCH a DELIGHTFUL hair cut (I should call it a hair styling now) bantering with the stylist. Lovely lady, a Malaysian Cantonese from KL, she’s been in Singapore for 20 years. She has one daughter studying Engineering at ITE.

After I paid her the S$10 for the haircut, she said “Thank you”, while shaking her head from side-to-side, Indian style. When I pointed that out to her in good nature, she burst out laughing! She realised she inadvertently did that because I am Indian.

We had a great laugh over that.

So lovely when a routine errand becomes a delightful experience.

Love it.

#mysingapore

 

I was driving along South Buona Vista Road on a Friday. I saw an elderly Chinese gentleman struggling to walk. He was ragged and very poorly. So I stopped at the side of the road, turned on my hazard lights and approached him.

He couldn’t speak English.

I was with someone who could. So she spoke to him and translated.

He was injured – scabs, limping, and smelling of alcohol. He had beers and empty beer cans in a supermarket type of plastic bag.

He was trying to get to a polyclinic. But all the cabs he hailed sailed pass him (I’m guessing because of how he looked).

I offered to give him a lift.

Just at that moment, a youngish (I’m guessing 30-something) Malay gentleman came up to us. He asked what was wrong. We explained.

He immediately took over. He said he worked at the National University Hospital. He advised me not to give the gentleman a lift to the polyclinic. He explained that if anything should happen along the way, I could be held liable.

But I insisted this man needs help.

The Malay gentleman completely took over. He reiterated he worked at NUH so he knew exactly what to do. He said he’d call an ambulance and wait with the man. He insisted we be on our way as he could handle this.

I thanked him for his kindness.

He then sheepishly admitted that he was on his way to the mosque when he noticed us. As he made his way to the mosque, he thought to himself, “What kind of Muslim am I to walk away from this?”

So he decided to turn around to help this man (and as it turned out, help us).

I am a Christian – a born-again one at that.

This man was the Good Samaritan. He is Muslim.

Luke 10:30-37:

Jesus said, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among robbers, and they stripped him and beat him, and went away leaving him half dead. And by chance a priest was going down on that road, and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. Likewise a Levite also, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, who was on a journey, came upon him; and when he saw him, he felt compassion, and came to him and bandaged up his wounds, pouring oil and wine on them; and he put him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn and took care of him. On the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper and said, ‘Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, when I return I will repay you.’ Which of these three do you think proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell into the robbers’ hands?” And he said, “The one who showed mercy toward him.” Then Jesus said to him, “Go and do the same.

Why do I share this?

Because Philippians 4:8:

Finally, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is of good repute, if there is any excellence and if anything worthy of praise, dwell on these things.

 

Revelations 14:11 

“And the smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and ever: and they have no rest day nor night, who worship the beast and his image, and whosoever receiveth the mark of his name.”

Shot by: Danesh Daryanani
Location: Haw Par Villa
Opening Picture: https://wallpaperscraft.com
Sound: iMovie 9.0.9
Edited on: iMovie 9.0.9

 

Emphasis in bold, mine. Take particular attention of what he is saying.

 

LHL

 

“The shocking terrorist attacks in Brussels today remind us yet again of the serious and continuing threat of terrorism.

I have written to the Belgian Prime Minister, Charles Michel, to express our condolences and sympathies to the families of the victims, and to the Belgian people.

Minister K Shanmugam Sc had just spoken last week about tightening up counter-terrorism measures in Singapore. We face a severe threat in Southeast Asia. It is not a matter of if, but when, that an attack will take place here. Indeed, today’s attacks in Brussels happened even though the Belgians were on full alert.

I hear that recently on a double decker bus, the driver stopped the bus, pointed at a bag left near the entrance and asked whose it was. The tension was palpable as he went round the second deck to try to identify the owner (whom he found). He then explained that we have to be vigilant about bags lying around, because of possible terrorist attacks, and the passengers murmured their assent. So the message is getting through to Singaporeans.”

Lee Hsien Loong

‪#‎BRUBlasts‬

Diptych (noun) A painting, especially an altarpiece, on two hinged wooden panels which may be closed like a book.

Image Credit: Still from Himala (Miracle)

Ingenious. Curators, Philip Cheah and Teo Swee Leng, together with the Gallery’s lovely film programmer, Pauline Soh, have lifted film beyond film.

Let me explain.

The Gallery has a film series called Painting with Light: Southeast Asian Film Series.

Why do I say “beyond film” and called this post “Diptych of Film”?

“Painting with Light” is held over the first weekend of every month – Saturday and Sunday. Two films – diptych – paired very deliberately over the weekend. I guess much like how a gourmand pairs food, wine, table setting, etc. to enhance the entire dining experience.

Philip is obviously passionate about film – specifically Asian film. I admire a person with passion, focus and actually doing something. Read about him here.

The first two films were screened on 5th and 6th of March. I watched both of them.

Quick details on both (click the title for synopsis and details):

GURINDAM JIWA (SONNETS OF THE SOUL), 1965, 84 minutes

Director: M Amin

TEMPORARY VISA, 2016, 124 minutes

Director: Ghazi Alqudcy

Very cleverly paired.

One movie is from the past (Saturday), the other from the present (Sunday). Both films are from the same national cinema and explore the same subject matter, but at different periods and different settings. The first two were Singaporean directors, the next instalment, Filipino, followed by Vietnamese and then Burmese.

This is from the Gallery’s website:

The inaugural edition of Painting with Light pairs a classic and a contemporary film from a national cinema in Southeast Asia each month. An older classic that addresses an important issue of its time will be screened on the Saturday, followed by a more recent film with a contemporary view on the same subject on the Sunday.

The first two movies were about being displaced from home. But I saw another theme in both movies – the tension between morality and love. In both movies the main players had to make morally tough decisions balancing love and doing the right thing.

What I really liked about the first pair is that not only did I enjoy the movies individually but also as I watched the pair, it made me reflect on how love, duty, morality and societal pressures have changed.  In my worldview, morality and love should be absolute and unchanging. But that’s me. I tend to think about these things a lot.

I had the honour of meeting the curator too – a very unassuming  gentleman. But if the first pair is anything to go by, the rest of the programme should be brilliant.

Looking forward to the rest. Go. Tickets here.

 

Death Penalty is government sanctioned punishment by death.

Yep, death. Terminal. No chance for redemption or reformation.

The crime is judged heinous enough to be deserving of nothing less than death for the person that committed, or allegedly committed, the criminal act.

Jesus was subjected to capital punishment.

Thankfully, He defeated even that.

Hosea 13:14 (KJV)

I will ransom them from the power of the grave; I will redeem them from death: O death, I will be thy plagues; O grave, I will be thy destruction: repentance shall be hid from mine eyes.

(Picture taken at Singapore Art Museum, March 2013)