I was driving along South Buona Vista Road on a Friday. I saw an elderly Chinese gentleman struggling to walk. He was ragged and very poorly. So I stopped at the side of the road, turned on my hazard lights and approached him.

He couldn’t speak English.

I was with someone who could. So she spoke to him and translated.

He was injured – scabs, limping, and smelling of alcohol. He had beers and empty beer cans in a supermarket type of plastic bag.

He was trying to get to a polyclinic. But all the cabs he hailed sailed pass him (I’m guessing because of how he looked).

I offered to give him a lift.

Just at that moment, a youngish (I’m guessing 30-something) Malay gentleman came up to us. He asked what was wrong. We explained.

He immediately took over. He said he worked at the National University Hospital. He advised me not to give the gentleman a lift to the polyclinic. He explained that if anything should happen along the way, I could be held liable.

But I insisted this man needs help.

The Malay gentleman completely took over. He reiterated he worked at NUH so he knew exactly what to do. He said he’d call an ambulance and wait with the man. He insisted we be on our way as he could handle this.

I thanked him for his kindness.

He then sheepishly admitted that he was on his way to the mosque when he noticed us. As he made his way to the mosque, he thought to himself, “What kind of Muslim am I to walk away from this?”

So he decided to turn around to help this man (and as it turned out, help us).

I am a Christian – a born-again one at that.

This man was the Good Samaritan. He is Muslim.

Luke 10:30-37:

Jesus said, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among robbers, and they stripped him and beat him, and went away leaving him half dead. And by chance a priest was going down on that road, and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. Likewise a Levite also, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, who was on a journey, came upon him; and when he saw him, he felt compassion, and came to him and bandaged up his wounds, pouring oil and wine on them; and he put him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn and took care of him. On the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper and said, ‘Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, when I return I will repay you.’ Which of these three do you think proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell into the robbers’ hands?” And he said, “The one who showed mercy toward him.” Then Jesus said to him, “Go and do the same.

Why do I share this?

Because Philippians 4:8:

Finally, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is of good repute, if there is any excellence and if anything worthy of praise, dwell on these things.

 

The MH370 incident is being watched by the whole world. Being under the spotlight, I assume that Malaysia Airlines writes each statement very intentionally with every sentence being carefully calibrated.

On Monday, 24 March 2014, Malaysia Airlines sent this SMS to the family members of those missing on MH370:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

(Source: Financial Times)

Now, here is the exact same statement with emphasis placed by me:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

If I had a daughter on that plane (I do not), how would I react to this?

Let me re-write the statement with the emphasis that me, as a fictional father, would react to:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and your daughter is dead. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we must now accept all evidence suggests the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

No matter how “beyond reasonable doubt” it is, the statement admits to being an assumption.

This is not going to give the fictional me (as a father) any closure.

If the findings were conclusive, what would have given me closure (though not comfort) is a statement of this nature:

“Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have conclusive evidence that MH370 has crashed and that none of those on board survived. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s prime minister, we have evidence that the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean.”

But that’s not what they wrote.

 

If this doesn’t make you smile, you win.

But I’m pretty sure I won.

These guys are infectious. In a good way.

Watch it. Capture the “feel.” Keep it on all weekend.

Have a good one.